Camila Rivera-Morales
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Camila Rivera-Morales, PhD

Clinical Psychologist; Behavioral Science Faculty

Languages spoken

Spanish

Education and training

Postdoctoral Fellowship - New York Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Clinical Internship - New York Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) - The New School for Social Research
Master of Arts (MA) - The New School for Social Research
Bachelor of Arts (BA) - The University of Virginia

Professional certifications or affiliations

The American Psychological Association

Professional interests

The study of personality structure and personality pathology
The study of intergenerational transmission of trauma
Bilingual and Trauma-informed psychotherapy

A little about me

I believe in providing inclusive, integrative patient-centered care, and strive to offer quality treatment in Spanish or English to populations that commonly have barriers to accessing it. I study and teach about psychosocial and sociocultural aspects of care, and aim to strengthen the relationship between psychotherapy and primary care providers.

Why I love my job

Historically, the field of psychology has participated in perpetuating patterns of social oppression. Thus, contributing to significant barriers to quality care for vulnerable and underserved communities. I believe that resisting this harmful trend and working to support those who are most in need of quality resources, is essential to collective psychic and social progress and wellbeing. I want to be part of this kind of change.

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Professional experience & accomplishments

Dr. Camila Rivera-Morales teaches about psychosocial aspects of health and illness. She provides trauma-informed and culture-informed psychotherapy in Spanish and English to children, adolescents and adults, most of whom identify as members of a stigmatized or underserved group. Her specialty areas and research interests include: the intergenerational transmission of trauma, the influence of personality structure on thought process and behavior, clinician-patient dynamics in the treatment of psychotic spectrum disorders, and sociocultural consideration in treatment. Her doctoral dissertation examined the relationships between intergenerational childhood maltreatment, parenting styles, neighborhood conditions, community threat and violence, acculturation, and racial and ethnic discrimination in a group of Latinx mothers.